#50: Johanna Dutton’s tips & tricks on resume writing for researchers looking to transition from academia to industry


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Johanna_DuttonJohanna Dutton is the Biomedical Engineer that after 10 years in industry decided to return to academia to pursue a PhD. She is also the Founder of Think Likely Resumes Service, a service providing do’s and don’ts on how to design a CV or resume for industry as well as interview coaching.

In this podcast Johanna will share her best tips and tricks on resume writing. We will learn how we can make our application letter and CV stand out and why it’s important to demonstrate other skills than the academic ones. She will also provide key points on what to include as well as exclude from the resume in order to convince the hiring manager or recruiter to meet up for an interview.

You need to be able to show that you have other skills and abilities that make you a competitive candidate.

– Johanna Dutton, PhD Graduate and Founder of Think Likely Resumes Service

About Johanna

Johanna earned her BS in Chemistry from the University of Connecticut and an MS in Analytical Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She then worked as an analytical chemist for almost ten years at Eisai before accepting a position as a formulation scientist at Novartis Vaccines, now GSK Vaccines. Currently, Johanna is a PhD Candidate in the Joint Program of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State. She spends some of her free time reviewing and editing resumes for students that want to transition from academia to industry.

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#48: Lina Tengdelius’ tips and tricks on how to find a job after a PhD


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Lina-TengdeliusWe are very happy to welcome Lina Tengdelius back to the show, this time to provide us with a tips & tricks-themed podcast on how to find a job after a PhD. In this episode, we learn more on how to structure our CV:s in the best way, what to write in a motivation letter and how to perform successfully in job interviews.

Dr Lina Tengdelius holds a MSc in Chemistry and a PhD in Materials Science with specialisation in Thin Film Physics from Linköping University, Sweden. She recently transitioned from academia to a role as a Consultant Manager at Dfind Science & Engineering. She works with recruiting people with a science background and reads a large number of CVs from PhDs every day.

Want to know more about Lina? Listen to her inspiring story on how she landed her current position and what her experiences on ‘the other side’ has taught her about the recruitment process: Episode #40: Lina Tengdelius’ story.

If you can’t motivate why you want the job more specifically than writing that it sounded interesting, maybe you don’t really want the job?.

– Dr Lina Tengdelius, Consultant Manager at Dfind Science & Engineering, Sweden

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Episode #45: MPAA group discussion on the importance of networking


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#45 - MPAA Berlin group discussion.png

In this episode, Tina Persson talks with a group of alumnae from the Max Planck Society about the benefits of a network to build your career during and after the PhD.

 

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Episode #43: Interview with Jon Tennant about Open Science

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Jon Tennant

In this episode, Johanna Havemann will talk with an expert in scholarly communication and publishing Jon Tennant.

He will tell us why he has decided to join the Open Science community, what are the main challenges on the way to alter the traditional publishing system, and share his tips how to contribute to the open access culture being a PhD student or a young researcher.

Jon finished his award-winning PhD at Imperial College London in 2017, where, as a paleontologist, he studied the evolution of dinosaurs, crocodiles, and other animals. For the last 7 years or so, he has been a fervent challenger of the status quo in scholarly communication and publishing and became the Communications Director of ScienceOpen for two years in 2015. Now, he is independent in order to continue his dino-research and work on building an Open Science MOOC to help train the next generation of researchers in open practices. He has published papers on Open Access and Peer Review, is currently leading the development of the Foundations for Open Science Strategy document and is the founder of the digital publishing platform paleorXiv. Jon is also an ambassador for ASAPbio and the Center for Open Science, a scientific advisor for Guaana and ScienceMatters, a Mozilla Open Leadership mentor, and the co-runner of the Berlin Open Science meetup. He is also a freelance science communicator and consultant and has written a kids book “Excavate Dinosaurs”.

We spend billions and billions and billions and billions, perhaps even trillions, every year, on doing research. And then we spend billions and billions and billions and billions, locking that research away. That just does not make any sense. That is not democracy; that is not a benefit to society.

– Dr. Jon Tennant

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Episode #42: Tips & tricks on how to prepare for an international career


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Anestis DougkasAnestis Dougkas returns for a tips & tricks-themed podcast on how you can prepare for an international career and become part of the global workforce. In episode #32 you can listen to his story on how his lifelong passion for chemistry has paved the way for his current position as a researcher in nutrition, health and eating behaviour in France.

Dr Anestis Dougkas is the researcher that take on the daily challenges in order to create a healthier world by making nutrition accessible. Currently, he is a Researcher in nutrition, health and eating behaviour at the Centre for Food and Hospitality Research at Institut Paul Bocuse, Lyon, France. He graduated from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece with a four-year B.Sc. degree in chemistry with specialization in biochemistry and food chemistry. He then continued his studies and received a M.Sc. in food science and nutrition and a Ph.D. in nutrition, within the Nutritional Research Group at University of Reading, UK. His Ph.D. work focused on the associations between consumption of dairy products and the risk of obesity. Specifically, he undertook epidemiological research and human dietary intervention trials, which investigated the effect of dairy on appetite regulation. In 2011, he got a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship at Food for Health Science Centre, Lund University, Sweden.

My three tips: 1. Stay flexible. 2. Be smart about international assignments. 3. Network, network, network!

– Dr Anestis Dougkas, Researcher at Institut Paul Bocuse, Lyon, France Continue reading “Episode #42: Tips & tricks on how to prepare for an international career”

Episode #37: Tips & Tricks on Mental Health during your PhD

Episode #37: Tips & Tricks on Mental Health during your PhD

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20170902_214903Welcome to a special episode of PhD Career stories. Our guests today are Yorick Peterse and Maria Eichel, whom we met at this year’s Max Planck Symposium for Alumni and Early Career Researchers (#MPSAECR) in Berlin, Germany. At this symposium, Maria and Yorick conducted a workshop on Mental Health and also wrote an article about it on the blog of the Max Planck PhDnet entitled The Mental Health of PhD Candidates.

Today, Maria and Yorick will tell us how “normal” it is to encounter mental health challenges during a PhD, which sounds rightfully alarming. There are numerous preventive and coping measures that can ease the situation. Some of these lie in your own hands, some are – and should be – offered to you by the research institution.

Reading suggestions

M Lisa, (Nov 2017) […] for better Graduate Student Mental Health. Academic Mental Health Collective

P Yorick, (Oct 2017) The Mental Health of PhD Candidates. Max Planck PhDnet

A Teresa, (Oct 2017) When the going gets tough, let me counsel you to seek counselling. phdlife.warwick.ac.uk

P Kate, (July 2017) Is it still taboo to take a mental health sick day? BBC News

L Katja et al, (May 2017) Work organization and mental health problems in PhD students. Research Policy 46(4) 868-879, doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2017.02.008

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Episode #33: Michael Gralla’s tips & tricks

Episode #33: Michael Gralla’s tips & tricks

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z62xzavrd1foz2pvw6dk_400x400Michael Gralla returns for a Tips & Tricks on Career Building, to shed light on what else is important to work on despite your scientific skills. In episode 26 you can hear what motivates him and why he is currently pausing his PhD for is own human capital company.

Linkedin: /michaelgralla
Website: fby – Find the Best in You.
Twitter: @michaelgralla

 

My three tips: 1) Become an expert in a discipline unrelated to your PhD project. 2) Get out! 3) Be brave.

 

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